Scientific Presentation Pro Tips Part 2: The Presentation

A while ago I wrote the first part of a series of posts on scientific presentation tips to present your research in a memorable and interesting way. In part 1, I described the preparation process, now it’s time for the actual presentation giving: what to do, what to wear and other convenient tips.

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Inbox Zero Redux: reduce e-mail overload like a boss

I thought it would be nice to discuss one of the ‘golden oldies’ of e-mail overload countering here: Inbox Zero and my modifications to Inbox Zero Redux. It’s been a while since this approach was introduced by Merlin Mann (an e-mail wizard name if I’ve ever heard one), 7 years already, but I still try to get my inbox to zero e-mails daily. And actually succeed most of the times. It might be a different story if suddenly start receiving hundreds of e-mails every day, but for now, this is working well for me.

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Scientific Presentation Pro Tips Part 1: The Preparation

In this post I’d like to give you some scientific presentation tips to present your research well. Over the years as a student and now PhD candidate I’ve given many a presentation and had many a course on giving good presentations. In my first couple of presentations I was a complete nervous wreck and could barely breathe, later on this ‘evolved’ into smiling during the entire presentation combined with (bad) improvisational jokes and now I can even state I actually look forward to preparing and giving presentations. I’d have to say the course I’ve learnt the most from was definitely ‘The Art of Presenting Science’ by the awesome Gijs Meeusen and his team, so some of the tips I’m writing about, I picked up there. I cannot recommend this course enough, so do try and take it somewhere if you’re able to. If you’re not, I believe Veronika will do a nice write up about this course at some point (edit: She did and it’s glorious! Check it out here!) . This post will describe phase one in the presentation giving process: the preparation. Whether you’re presenting for your research group, at a conference or elsewhere, always be prepared 🙂

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The Standing Desk Review

For the past five months I’ve been in the luxurious position(s) of having the option to do my work while standing when I feel like it. This is all thanks to the pleasant people at my work that arranged a special standing desk for me. I think it’s a good time for a review of my standing desk experiences. In this post I will describe the benefits I’ve personally experienced as well as the disadvantages and some tips and tricks.

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Gamification in your PhD? Gamify Your Life with HabitRPG!

Is gamification a suitable technique for maintaining motivation and momentum in your PhD? While I dislike buzzwords like these a lot, I think gamification has great potential in many applications. I guess most people are familiar with the success of Stack Overflow, a well-known example of gamification done right, but can techniques like these be successfully applied to everyday activities as well?

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Procrastinate much? Become more productive: one Pomodoro at a time!

Do you know that feeling when you’re staring at the screen needing to get some work done and then you find yourself subconsciously opening a new tab to check what’s going on on Facebook, another tab for Twitter, maybe even one more tab for Google+ in case anyone actually decides to posts something there 😉 Suddenly you realize: ‘I really need to start working on this!’. So there you are again, closed all the distracting websites, ready to get started again. But wait, wasn’t there something else you needed to do before starting? Wasn’t there an e-mail that needed answering?

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My Medical Visualization Software Development Setup and Tech Stack

Right, I’ll be the first to admit I’m kind of a lazy software developer. Sure, if I really need to, I’ll build something myself, but I’ll take no pleasure in it. At all! I use Windows and am no longer ashamed to admit it. I’m always a happy camper when other people decide to make binaries available (thank you other people!). In this post I’ll summarize my current setup including the links to the binaries. This is mainly a reference for future me, in case I need to re-install somewhere, but hopefully other people will find it helpful as well. So here is a list of the things I can’t develop without:

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New Publication: ”Toward a highly-detailed 3D pelvic model” and Google Scholar Citations

I love the smell of new publications in the morning! This particular morning I woke up to a nice little e-mail from Google Scholar entitled ‘Review updates to your Google Scholar profile’. It featured a brand new publication for me to approve and to add to my Google Scholar profile:

  • Toward a highly-detailed 3D pelvic model: Approaching an ultra-specific level for surgical simulation and anatomical education. A.C. Kraima, N.N. Smit, D. Jansma, C. Wallner, R.L.A.W. Bleys, C.J.H. v.d. Velde, C.P. Botha, M.C. Deruiter, Clinical Anatomy, December 2012

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A look back on 2012

As is traditional in this time of year, I thought it would be nice to summarize some of the highlights in my professional life of 2012. The year started well enough, I was working on my master thesis (The Unified Anatomical Human) and finally graduated in March obtaining my degree in Computer Science – Media and Knowledge Engineering.

At the graduation ceremony with Professor Jansen

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